Tuesday, May 8, 2018

Are You Stuck?













Last week I was talking with Sam, a new client who hired me to help him streamline his office procedures. The chore that requires much of his time is his bookkeeping, which he does by hand! He said that its time consuming, but works for him because he knows how to do it this way and feels comfortable with it.

Sam’s father initiated this accounting method when he opened the business 30 years ago, and since then they’ve ‘always done it this way’.  In the early days they were a small company with only 4 employees, and this was the best way available to keep track of finances.  When Sam took over 5 years ago, the firm employed 37 people, and they were still doing finances by hand!

Sam explained that he’d thought about switching to a computer accounting program because he knows it will save time, give him access to all kinds of reports and tax information, and streamline his entire bookkeeping operation.  However, he was having trouble letting go of how it had always been done. 

Is This You?
Does any of this sound familiar to you?  Are there areas in your business or personal life where you are still doing things as they’ve always been done, even though it’s no longer efficient?  Places where it’s probably time to make changes and grow, but for some reason you are reluctant to actually do it?  If so, you are definitely not alone.  There are many reasons why people are hesitant to let go of doing things the way they have always done them.

Comfort Zone
One of the main reasons is that doing something the way you’ve always done it keeps you in your comfort zone.  Your comfort zone is a very nice place in which you are a capable, competent person who understands what is going on and feels in control of it all.  It’s a pleasant, cozy, safe place to be.  Why would you want to let go of that?

However, the down side of your comfort zone is that it keeps you stuck and stops your growth.  It reinforces using procedures and behaviors that may be outdated or inefficient, and makes your business vulnerable to your competition.  It is also a boring place to be, and robs you of the opportunity to grow, learn new things and become the best you can be.

Fear of Change
Another reason you might be staying in your comfort zone is the fear of change. Change often represents uncertainty, and the unknown is a scary place. You don’t know for sure how things will turn out.  It’s a place where, for a time, you feel inadequate and confused instead of competent and capable.  There is also the fear that you may not be smart, good or clever enough to master the new thing.

Many people spend their lives doing everything they can to avoid fear.  However, the reality is that every change, anything new, will involve some fear.  The way to deal with fear is to confront and move through it.  Feel the fear and do it anyway!

From Master to Novice
Another part of change is that you go from being a master at something to being a novice.  When something is new you begin the learning curve all over again.  In this situation the fear of not being able to master the new thing is often very present and can be a huge deterrent to making a change.

When you look at your life you can see that you’ve already mastered this process many times. As a child you probably moved through the school system, which is set up so children reach a level of mastery and then become novices again. You started elementary school in kindergarten, new to the idea of school.  You learned and adapted to the process and place, to the point where you were comfortable and proficient in functioning within the system. Then you moved to junior high school, with a whole new set of rules and systems, and were suddenly a novice again. You learned and grew into junior high, and then repeated the process again when moving to high school, college, into a job, etc.  With each step you expanded your comfort zone. A process that was initially uncomfortable but eventually empowering.  Stretching your comfort zone is one way you learn you are a capable competent person.

In Sam’s case, in order to update his accounting he will have to go from being totally proficient with the system, to being new and temporarily confused.  From being the person who knows how to handle it all to being the person who has to rely on others while he’s in the learning process.  Growth always involves a period of being new, and new is always uncomfortable.

Why Have I Always Done It This Way?
Have you asked yourself why it’s always been done that way?  Often systems are implemented, or relationships or routines are created because they are the best available at the time.  However, as time passes and new ways of doing things are available, what was once state-of-the-art may become outdated and inefficient.

For example, when I was a child I would stand holding the refrigerator door open while deciding on a snack.  My mother would always tell me to close the door because all the cold air was escaping.  Since she did that with me, I did the same with my children (we’d always done it that way).  Until one day my son asked “why”?  He pointed out that the refrigerator was electric and constantly made more cold air, so it escaping wasn’t really a problem. Of course, he was right! I’d never thought about why I was delivering this message, so I asked my mother where it came from.  She said that her mother always said it to her, so she believed it and passed it along.  However, when my mother was a small child, refrigerators were actual iceboxes, which were cooled by large blocks of ice. When the door was opened the ice melted faster and they really did run out of cold air.

When my grandmother told her children to close the door, it was the right message for the situation.  As the message was passed on from generation to generation, the situation changed and the fridge no longer ran out of cold air.  (I do understand it takes electricity to generate more). However, nobody looked at the reason for the message.  We just kept doing it as we’d always done it.

In Sam’s case the accounting system his father implemented was right for the time, but changes in technology have refined the most effective way to track finances.  It’s important to understand why the system was created, what need it was designed to fill.  Look at it and see if it is still the most efficient way to fill this need, or if a more effective way is now available.  This applies to how you run your personal as well as your business life.

How Do You Know You’re Stuck?
Sometimes you may not consciously realize that you are stuck and that it’s time to make a change. When something becomes a struggle, takes too much time, or feels like a huge chore, it may be an indication that you are doing it the way it’s always been done rather than the more efficient and effective way.  You can often identify what may have outlived its usefulness by noting the things that are difficult, and asking yourself why you do them the way you do.

What To Do
Once you have identified things that may need a change, ask yourself:
·         Where did this procedure originate?
·         What was its original purpose?
·         Does this still apply?
·         Is there an easier way to accomplish the same goal?
·         What are the consequences of continuing to do things the way we’ve always done them?
·         What will be the results of implementing a new process?
·         What is stopping me from implementing this new process?
·         What will I do about this?

Once you’ve answered these questions, it’s time to move. Change the procedure, buy and learn the new program, delegate to whomever can do the job, or completely let go of the procedure if it no longer applies.

After going through this process Sam decided to take a leap of faith and implement a computer accounting program for his business.  He expanded his personal and business comfort zone by hiring a professional to help him become proficient in the new software.  He endured a brief period of feeling totally lost, and soon became as skilled with the new system as he was with the old.  The new system has accomplished his goal of streamlining his accounting and providing him with more time to focus on other aspects of his business. Sam has also renewed his sense of being even more empowered, capable and competent.

Of course, your comfort zone also applies to your personal life.  You might be keeping behaviors, relationships, locations and habits that worked for you in the past, but now just keep you stifled and stuck.

So you may want to ask yourself, where in my life do I feel stuck or like I’m doing something just because it’s familiar, comfortable, and always been done that way?  What things do I need to change, but I’m hesitant because I’m afraid of looking/feeling awkward and stupid, or fearful of failing?  What would I like to do about that?

It’s something to think about.


Please comment so others can benefit from your wisdom and experience

For a FREE worksheet to help you look at, “I’ve Always Done It That Way”, and many FREE exercises on ways to empower yourself, see the Resources Page on our Inside Jobs Coach website.  Also be sure to check out our Books page.

If you would like to feel more confident and believe in yourself, check out The Confidence Pack, which contains several powerful worksheets to guide you and an amazing hypnotherapy session to strengthen your belief in yourself.

If you'd like to bring positive changes into your life, we have the perfect thing for you.  Check out The Rapid Power Pack, and begin to create the life of your dreams.


Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Just say, "NO!"













Last week my friend, Steve, was talking about how overwhelmed he feels.  He said he has too much to do at work, and in his “free” time, he’s busy every minute.  When I asked him to elaborate, he explained that during the workday there are several co-workers who complain about all they have to do, and ask him for help.  Since he wants to be a good employee and team player, he always steps up and says “yes.”  Then he ends up having to do his work and theirs too, and he’s swamped.

Instead of being grateful for his help, his colleagues are then angry with him because he doesn’t have the time to do a perfect job on the projects he’s taken over for them.

Steve explained that outside of work he is on the Board of Directors for three non-profit organizations, plus he coaches his daughter’s soccer team.  His wife is angry with him for never having time to spend with her or do things around the house, his golf group has given up on him because he’s always busy with something else when invited to play, and his children complain that they never see him.

Steve is so busy trying to be helpful and supportive to everyone, that he’s forgotten to take care of himself.  He has no boundaries around his life, and the result is that it’s completely out of control.

The problem is that Steve hasn’t learned to say “NO!”  He is afraid that if he turns people down they will think he’s selfish and won’t like him.

The reality is that he needs to take care of himself as much, or even more, than he takes care of others.  If he doesn’t do this, he will end up alienating the people he cares about, will feel exhausted and miserable, and his overwhelmed body will probably get sick.

Steve has forgotten to treat himself with the same respect he gives others.  It’s time for him to decide what is most important, set boundaries around his time, and learn to say “NO”. 

A great phrase to use when telling someone “no” is, “I’m sorry, that doesn’t work for me.”  Don’t give them reasons or explain why, because they will argue with whatever you say.  Just repeat, “I’m sorry, that won’t work for me.”

The other person will be frustrated because they can’t argue and try to change your mind, but you will be standing your ground, making your boundary clear, and taking care of your needs.

It’s time to give it a try.  Just say “NO!”

Please comment so others can benefit from your wisdom and experience

For FREE worksheets on ways to empower yourself, see the Resources Page on our Inside Jobs Coach website.  Also be sure to check out our Books page.

If you'd like to bring positive changes into your life, we have the perfect thing for you.  Check out The Rapid Power Pack, and begin to create the life of your dreams.

If you would like to feel more confident and believe in yourself, check out The Confidence Pack, which contains several powerful worksheets to guide you and an amazing hypnotherapy session to strengthen your belief in yourself.


Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Are You Afraid of Your Shadow?

Do you occasionally find yourself thinking or feeling something negative about another person or yourself?

If you do, you’re not alone.  No matter how loving, kind, thoughtful and smart you are, there will be times when negative thoughts will surface.

This part of you is sometimes called your Shadow (a concept created by psychologist Carl Jung), and is the part of you that is everything you like to think you’re not.  It’s the angry, jealous, spiteful, vengeful, violent, ignorant, etc. part of who you are.

When you were a child you probably got in trouble, or people didn’t like you, when you let your Shadow side show, so you learned to hide and ignore it as much as possible.

However, denying your Shadow is denying an important piece of the total human being you are, and running away from it can control your life.

The trick is to recognize your Shadow and notice when it surfaces. Instead of negatively judging yourself for it, pay attention to the thoughts, look at where they came from, and let them go.

Once you acknowledge your Shadow it will lose its power of you.  You will no longer have to run from it or deny an important aspect of yourself.

One of the key elements in creating positive self-esteem is the development of acceptance and compassion for all facets of your personality. Not merely for the part of yourself that is "the good little girl or boy," the part who follows all the "shoulds," but also for the parts of your personality that you may want to hide, even from yourself.

It might help to look at your personality as a series of circles, one inside the other. 



Your Façade

Your Shadow

Your Real Self 

The outermost circle is your Facade. This is the part of yourself that you choose to share with the world most of the time. This is the nice, polite, creative, attractive, intelligent, strong, cooperative part. It is also the part you want to believe is the total you, since it gains you the most love, acceptance, and positive feedback from others. It’s the part of yourself you use to gain a sense of worth. Fortunately it is only one aspect of the person you really are.

The second circle is called The Shadow. This is a concept taken from the work of psychologist Carl Jung, and refers to the hidden and repressed aspects of your personality. This includes all the negative conclusions you drew about yourself during childhood, all the unpleasant feelings and thoughts that go against your "shoulds" and expectations, and label you as incompetent, unlovable, and worthless.

It also includes the part of you that experiences “negative” emotions and thoughts about others.

You may fear that this Shadow aspect defines who you really are, and live in terror of yourself or others seeing through your Facade to these dark, black, embarrassing, negative feelings. However, it is important to understand that The Shadow is as essential to the total you as your Facade is, and that it is not your identity! The Shadow does not define who you are, just as your Facade does not.  They are both a part of the incredible whole.

As long as you are afraid to confront your Shadow, this fear will control you. You will spend a lot of time, energy, and money trying to ignore or deny part of your being. It's exhausting!

However, when you finally allow yourself to get in touch with EVERY part of your personality, you will find it incredibly freeing. Once you confront your darkest fears about yourself, those fears will lose their power and you will be well along the road to complete self-acceptance, compassion, and acknowledgment of your Real Self.

The innermost circle represents Your Real Self, and is the combination of all parts of your personality: the positive and negative, good and evil, gifts and talents and all aspects that go into making you a one-of-a-kind person.

Once you recognize your Real Self you will no longer feel the need to maintain a Façade, believe other people's "shoulds", or deny your Shadow. With the knowledge of, and acceptance and compassion for, your total self, you will at last be able to relax and enjoy all parts of the amazing and unique person you are.

You will never again have to be afraid of your Shadow.

Please comment so others can benefit from your wisdom and experience

For FREE worksheets on ways to empower yourself, see the Resources Page on our Inside Jobs Coach website.  Also be sure to check out our Books page.

If you'd like to bring positive changes into your life, we have the perfect thing for you.  Check out The Rapid Power Pack, and begin to create the life of your dreams.

If you would like to feel more confident and believe in yourself, check out The Confidence Pack, which contains several powerful worksheets to guide you and an amazing hypnotherapy session to strengthen your belief in yourself.


Monday, March 26, 2018

Are You Just Talking or Are You Communicating?

Several years ago my two young children, my husband and I were traveling in the car. The traffic was heavy and my husband was tense at the wheel. The kids were giggling and playing in the back seat and in frustration my husband said “will you kids please be quiet so I can focus on the traffic”. The kids responded by lowering their voices and playing in a less rowdy fashion. Their father became more agitated and said, “Quiet down NOW!” The children lowered their voices a bit more and continued to giggle and play. Their stressed father then turned around and yelled “I said BE QUIET!!!, at which point the shocked children stopped talking completely and the mood in the car was incredibly tense.

When I later reflected on this situation I realized that what had happened was a failure to communicate. When my husband used the word “quiet” he meant silent, but our children interpreted it to mean less volume. A very uncomfortable situation was caused by the lack of a common word definition. 

COMMON SITUATION

What happened in the car that day is very common when people attempt to communicate. We often think we’re having a meeting of the minds, and later discover there was no connection at all.  How often have you walked away from talking with someone thinking they understood what you said, and then found out s/he had no clue what you were talking about?

Although common, situations such as this can be avoided if we use a few simple techniques.  The first is to realize that both participants in a conversation have a role to play.
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Most people assume that the person doing the speaking is the one who is communicating. In reality communication is a two-way street and the roles of both speaker and listener are equally important. Fortunately there are several things each can do to insure that the process of delivering and receiving information flows smoothly. 

BE PRESENT/PAY ATTENTION

The first thing is for both participants to be mentally present and pay attention. This sounds obvious, but how many times have you been in a conversation where you’ve been distracted by things around you, are thinking about how you’ll respond, or wondering what you’ll have for dinner? If both participants aren’t fully present and completely tuned in to the conversation, clear communication will not take place. 

BODY LANGUAGE

The second thing both participants can do is to be aware of their body language. Studies have shown that over 75% of communication is nonverbal. Things such as eye contact, tone of voice, facial expression and how you hold your arms, all communicate your level of interest in what’s going on.  To facilitate good communication, both speaker and listener must maintain good eye contact, use a pleasant tone of voice, make sure their body is in an “open”, friendly position, and smile and nod to indicate they are on the same page.

FEEDBACK

The third thing both speaker and listener can do is to give feedback to each other.  This may be nonverbally, as we just mentioned, or spoken. The listener can clarify word definitions or ask questions if something is unclear. The speaker can define words that might be confusing or misunderstood, and ask if there are questions or if clarification is needed.  Since we all come from our own experience and perspective, we often hear what we’re expecting or wanting to hear rather than what is actually said. If this skill had been used during the interaction between my children and their father I’m sure there would have been more understanding and probably no conflict. 

TWO LEVELS

The fourth thing both speaker and listener can do is be aware that communication happens on at least two levels. There is the content level, which is the literal meaning of the spoken words, and there is the process level, which refers to the feelings beneath the words. In the situation with my husband and children, the content was that he wanted them to be quiet. The process was that he was tense and stressed with the traffic situation and needed their help in coping with it. If the listener is aware of both levels it will add to his/her understanding of what the speaker is conveying, and can help him/her respond in the most appropriate way.

When you are listening and what you’re hearing on both levels is the same, you are probably receiving the intended message.  However, often the message is different, and this can lead to major confusion on the part of the listener. A common example of this is when you ask someone how s/he is doing and in a sad, slow voice they reply “I’m fine”.  The words say all is well, however the nonverbal cues may be telling you the words aren’t true.  When the process and content are not congruent it’s important for the listener to pick up on this and ask about what’s really going on.

Both participants can also further communication by summarizing what they are saying or hearing, and giving occasional feedback to each other to insure they’re both on the same track. 

BE BRIEF, BE BOLD, BE GONE!

One last hint is for the speaker to be specific and brief about what s/he’s saying. We’ve all known people who tend to ramble and add unnecessary details when they talk. They are usually difficult to understand. A good speaker follows the rule "Be Brief, Be Bold, and Be Gone!”

So, when you interact with your employees, customers/ clients, family and friends are you effectively communicating or just talking? Do you clarify?  Are you fully present, using positive body language, defining your words and giving feedback? Do you listen fully and with an open mind?

Communicating effectively takes work, but the rewards are great. I think you will be pleased to find that when you make the effort to communicate clearly your relationships will suddenly become easy and uncomplicated.  Why not give it a try?

Please comment so others can benefit from your wisdom and experience

For FREE worksheets on ways to empower yourself, see the Resources Page on our Inside Jobs Coach website.  Also be sure to check out our Books page.

If you'd like to bring positive changes into your life, we have the perfect thing for you.  Check out The Rapid Power Pack, and begin to create the life of your dreams.


If you would like to feel more confident and believe in yourself, check out The Confidence Pack, which contains several powerful worksheets to guide you and an amazing hypnotherapy session to strengthen your belief in yourself. 

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Are You Plugged In and Tuned Out?













Last week a friend and I were at a restaurant having lunch, and I noticed the three people at the table next to ours.  One was checking his email, another was talking on her phone, and the third was looking incredibly bored as his table mates gave all their attention to their electronic devices.

After this experience I began to notice how our electronics seem to have replaced human interaction.  It’s now common to see several people walking down the street together, but totally ignoring each other as they listen to their music or talk on their phones.  In meetings people often spend the entire time checking email or texting rather than paying attention to the speaker.  In many personal and business interactions, email has replaced a phone call.  We seem to be sending information, but are we really connecting with each other?

Human beings build relationships by developing and nurturing caring, trust and connection.  That doesn’t happen when we are focused on inanimate objects instead of each other.

Technology is amazing, and is incredibly valuable in many instances.  However, I still believe that when I’m with someone at a meal, walking down the street, or in a meeting, they deserve my undivided attention.  Presumably the reason we are together is to connect in some way, for some purpose.  So we need to do that by looking each other in the eye and paying attention.

I would also appreciate the same courtesy from others.  Hopefully they feel that whatever we’re doing together is important in some way, and will give it, and me, that respect.

So, this month I’m reflecting on the importance of really connecting with the people in my life.  Making sure that when we are together they get my undivided attention.  The technology will still be there when we part.


How about you?

Please comment so others may benefit from your wisdom and experience.

For FREE worksheets on ways to empower yourself, see the Resources Page on our Inside Jobs Coach website.  Also be sure to check out our Books page.

If you'd like to bring positive changes into your life, we have the perfect thing for you.  Check out The Rapid Power Pack, and begin to create the life of your dreams.

If you would like to feel more confident and believe in yourself, check out The Confidence Pack, which contains several powerful worksheets to guide you and an amazing hypnotherapy session to strengthen your belief in yourself. 

Wednesday, February 21, 2018

How Do You Work?













Susan was so frustrated with her new office manager Jim, she was ready to fire him!  She said his habit of waiting until the last minute to begin jobs was driving her crazy. Whenever there was a project with a deadline, Jim didn’t even begin to work on it until the last minute.  Somehow he usually managed to get the job done, but it was always in crisis mode, with a huge burst of energy and stress.

Also, the one-time tasks that didn’t have a deadline, such as cleaning out the supply closet, never got done.

Susan is the kind of person who likes to tackle a job as soon as she learns about it.  She immediately sets out a work schedule, and is able to pace herself throughout the project, so that she eases up to the deadline with everything in order.

It’s no wonder that Jim’s deadline-driven style drove her crazy.

Unfortunately, Susan took Jim’s behavior personally and thought it was designed to irritate her.  It became a power and control issue between them.  She would speak sarcastically to Jim or nag him about how the project was coming, and he would become defensive and work even slower.  Obviously, this was unproductive for them both.

As we talked, Susan realized that people have different styles of functioning.  Once she understood that Jim was just doing things the way that worked best for him, she could acknowledge that he worked more efficiently when his deadline was near.  She admitted that he always managed to finish the project on time, and that the stress was her own because she mistakenly thought that Jim’s high energy rushing around was an indication that the project was out of control.

Once she realized it wasn’t personal and that Jim did know what he was doing, she could let go of the power struggle and talk with Jim about their different work styles.

Together they worked out a way that met both of their needs:

·        Jim agreed that when given a project, he would let Susan know that he understood the job, goal and completion date.  He would share with her the steps he would take to complete the project, reassuring Susan that he knew what was expected of him and by when.

·        He would then take some action each week to move the project forward, and check in with Susan on Friday at 3:00 to let her know where he was in the process.

·        For projects with no deadline, they decided to create one.  For example, they agreed that the supply cabinet would be cleaned by the last day of the month.  They also agreed that it was OK for Susan to occasionally check in with Jim on how the project was coming along, as long as she didn’t nag or try to take control.


This method worked for both of them, because it supported each of their working styles.  It made Jim responsible and gave him the freedom to work at his own pace without Susan looking over his shoulder, and provided him with accountability at their Friday meetings. It also provided Susan with the reassurance that Jim was aware of the project and making progress, so she didn’t feel that she needed to be on top of it every day.

Just like Susan and Jim, most of us have a style of approaching and tackling a project, a style that works best for us and fits the person we are.  If you are functioning in a group, team, or family, it helps to understand your own style and those of the people in your office or home.

Once you understand the different styles and discuss them, you can let go of any emotion attached to the situation and create an action plan that meets everyone’s needs. 

Please comment so others can benefit from your wisdom and experience

For FREE worksheets on ways to empower yourself, see the Resources Page on our Inside Jobs Coach website.  Also be sure to check out our Books page.

If you'd like to bring positive changes into your life, we have the perfect thing for you.  Check out The Rapid Power Pack, and begin to create the life of your dreams.

If you would like to feel more confident and believe in yourself, check out The Confidence Pack, which contains several powerful worksheets to guide you and an amazing hypnotherapy session to strengthen your belief in yourself.


Wednesday, February 14, 2018

How Are You Honest?













Jill was demoralized and confused.  She said that her boyfriend, Dave, often said hurtful things to her, and when she called him on it he responded by saying, “Well, you want me to be honest, don’t you?”

Jill said that when they began their relationship they agreed to be honest with each other. She wanted to do that to insure there would be no big secrets that got in the way.  Because of this agreement she was confused about her reaction when Dave was ‘honest’.

I asked her for an example of his comments.  She said he often made hurtful remarks about how she looked or dressed, saying, “I can’t believe you’re going to wear that”, or “Your hair is so awful, can’t you do something with it?”  When she got upset he’d say, “I’m just telling you the truth. Isn’t that what we agreed to do?”

Jill and I spent some time looking at the fact that defining what is true often involves individual perception, and that there are as many different perceptions as there are people.  The way Dave perceived things and the way Jill did were often different, so when he was ‘being honest’ he was really stating things from his perspective, with which she might or might not agree.

We then looked at the difference between Total Honesty and Brutal Honesty.  The most important thing in being honest is the intent.  When someone is Totally Honest with you, their intent will be loving and respectful, and they will phrase things in a tactful, gentle and supportive way.

If Dave’s intention was to be caring and supportive, he could have easily said, “Since the invitation said ‘formal wear’ I’m wondering if a different dress might be more appropriate for this occasion.” Or, “You have such a lovely face, and that hairstyle hides it.”

When someone is Brutally Honest, the intent is to assert power and use ‘honesty’ as a weapon to gain control.  Brutal Honesty is cruel, disrespectful, hurtful and destructive.

Dave was being Brutally Honest, which was abusive, and Jill’s reactions to his comments were appropriate.  She felt attacked, yet wasn’t able to defend against his assertion that he was ‘just being honest.’

Once Jill understood that she wanted honesty that was supportive and loving, she decided to no longer let Dave’s assertion that he was just “being honest” justify his hurtful comments.  She made the decision to talk with him about being supportive instead of abusive. His response to this conversation would tell her a lot about the future of their relationship.

So, I’m wondering how you and the people around you are honest.  Are you supportive and respectful, or hurtful and cruel?

It’s something to think about.


 Please comment so others can benefit from your wisdom and experience

For FREE worksheets on ways to empower yourself, see the Resources Page on our Inside Jobs Coach website.  Also be sure to check out our Books page.

If you'd like to bring positive changes into your life, we have the perfect thing for you.  Check out The Rapid Power Pack, and begin to create the life of your dreams.

If you would like to feel more confident and believe in yourself, check out The Confidence Pack, which contains several powerful worksheets to guide you and an amazing hypnotherapy session to strengthen your belief in yourself.